GMWDA transfers into the GMCA

From 1st April 2018 the Greater Manchester Waste Disposal Authority transferred all its duties, obligations and statutory powers for waste disposal to the Greater Manchester Combined Authority. The move is part of the 2014 ground-breaking devolution agreement.

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GMWDA Statement on the 2018/19 Budget

On Thursday the 8th February 2018, the Greater Manchester Waste Disposal Authority (GMWDA) approved a £91.893 million budget for 2018/19.

This year’s budget includes the return of the 2017/18 ‘invest to save’ increase in levy of £77.7 million, which was not ultimately needed to deliver GMWDA’s ambitious Savings Programme.

To mitigate the burden of the levy on GMWDA’s nine districts there has been a corresponding increase in the GMCA levy (transport element), which in turn, reduces the impact to an average increase of 0% (zero).

Going forward, it is expected that the levy will increase broadly in line with inflation, with the Medium Term Financial Plan (MTFP) projections being 3% in 2019/20 – dropping to 1.7% in 2020/21 and 1.6% in 2021/22 (all figures excluding the switch of levy resources with GMCA Transport).

Greater Manchester is the UK’s largest combined waste authority with 2.2 million people and handling in excess of 1 million tonnes of material per annum – a total of 4% of England’s waste. The budget allows the continuation of high levels of landfill diversion – currently running at 85% – an increase from 80% in 2009 when facilities transformation programme started. Similarly progress has been made in boosting recycling rates – from an average of 32% to over 50%.

Commenting on the final budget that the Authority will agree before its merger into the wider Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA) on the 1st April 2018, Councillor Nigel Murphy, Chair of GMWDA, commented:

“The budget for 2018/19 contains savings delivered from the GMWDA’s move away from a PFI arrangement to one that has allowed us to take back control to drive savings – initially on debt financing – but also by changing the way that waste is processed.”

He adds: “In line with these savings and, despite a reduction in the budget, very high levels of recycling and diversion continue to be achieved. We are well on track with our aim to reach 60% recycling by 2025 and 90% landfill diversion by 2021. The ability to deliver all those environmental and financial benefits – against a 0% budget increase – is a testament to the support for recycling from our residents and the work that the Authority has achieved over its 32 year history.”

 

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Greater Manchester Waste Disposal Authority

Greater Manchester Waste Disposal Authority